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Questions to Consider

You might ask how it can be possible to know more about yourself than you already do, but in truth very few people know themselves as they might. This probably includes you. When Socrates said, “The unexamined life isn’t worth living,” this is what he was talking about. Take a deep, hard look at fascinating you. Examine your life. So, where to start?

  1. You can often learn a lot about a character in a book or movie by what he or she wants. What do you want, desire, or crave in your life? Do you have a passion that drives you? Are you a fan? Do you have hobbies? What’s on your bucket list? What dream makes you, well, you?

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  2. Consider where you are on any number of sliding scales—at the left, at the right, or somewhere in the middle. Are you an introvert or extrovert, quiet or loud, humorous or humorless, class clown or A student, a dog person or a cat person, a giver or a taker, honest or devious, a self-starter or someone who needs direction, a listener or a talker, a leader or a follower, a spiritual person or a secular one, and on and on.

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  3. Take a hard look at your personal values. Write them down. How do they look on paper? Do you value honesty, reliability, patience, or something else?

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  4. Get close but candid friends to give you an honest assessment. How do they picture your identity? What do they perceive your values to be? Is there a difference between the way you perceive yourself and the way others perceive you?

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  5. Consider your history and setting. Where did you grow up? How are your family members and friends part of your identity? Are you content with the way you are and where you’re headed, or is this a starting place toward somewhere else?

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  6. Think about whether knowing more about your identity helps you focus on the people you want to be around, where you want to go in your life, what you desire, and what you value most. Has this process changed any of your goals or modified your understanding of what success and a richer life means for you?

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  7. Are there any labels you have for yourself? Do others know you by certain labels? Are they fair, proper, and do you deserve them, or are they like shackles from which you should shake free?

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Identity: Your Passport to Success

This chapter is from the book

Identity: Your Passport to Success