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FranklinCovey Style Guide for Business and Technical Communication: Abbreviations

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  1. Using the Reference Glossary
  2. Abbreviations
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This chapter is from the book
This Reference Glossary is designed and written to help writers and editors answer routine, yet important, questions about the preparation of business and technical documents. This section covers abbreviations.

Using the Reference Glossary

The Reference Glossary is designed and written to help writers and editors answer routine, yet important, questions about the preparation of business and technical documents. The alphabetical arrangement of the entries allows writers to answer questions easily and rapidly, often without having to search through the Index. The many illustrative phrases, words, and sentences make the various rules and suggestions practical and applicable to real-world situations.

Still, as with any reference book, users need to become familiar with what the Reference Glossary covers and what it doesn’t cover. To assist new users, we make the following suggestions about using the Reference Glossary.

  • Use the alphabetical arrangement to help you find where a specific topic is addressed. As with any alphabetical list, you may have to try a couple of titles before you find the information you want. If you cannot find a topic, refer to the Index (p. 421).
  • After you have found the relevant entry, survey the listed rules or headings previewed in the shaded box at the beginning of the entry. Then turn to the rule or heading that appears to answer your question.
  • Read the rule and accompanying text. Be sure to review any illustrative phrases or sentences because they will often help clarify the rule. Remember, also, that many of the rules are suggestions rather than legal requirements.
  • Check to see if any notes follow the rule and its examples. Notes begin with the word NOTE and are numbered if there are several notes. Notes often include information about exceptions or options to the stated rule.
  • Turn to other entries that are cross-referenced, especially if you still have questions that the entry has not answered. Cross-references have this format: See LETTERS and MEMOS.
  • Don’t be disappointed if you cannot find the answer to a question. No reference book can answer every question. To help answer difficult or obscure questions, experienced writers and editors usually have several recent references available. For a list of other references, see the entry entitled REFERENCES.
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